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the fiscal cliff. washington journal is live starting at 7:00 eastern on c-span. >> president obama travels to pennsylvania friday to talk about his plan to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. we'll be live from the manufacturing company at noon eastern an c-span2 3. >> worked his way up, went to harvard law school and then immigrated out west to illinois where the lead mine industry was in its hey day. he arrived after about a month's journey by shi ship, by stagecoach, by train and arrived on this steam boat in this muddy mining town boarded himself in a log cabin, established a law practice in a log cabin and worked his way up and became a successful lawyer. and got involved politically and ran for congress eight terms. and then befriended abraham lincoln from illinois. and then grant. and as they were on the rice, wash burn stayed with them as a close colleague during the civil war. and after grant was elected president he initially appointed him secretary of state. and at that time he became very ill. so after about ten days, he submitted his resignation to president grant and so he acce
that would be impacted of congress did not act on the fiscal cliff. washington general is live at 7:00 eastern on c-span. >> at the end of world war ii, we had 12 million men under arms. today we have 1000 generals and 1.2 million under arms. we almost have an admiral forever ship in the navy. what we have done is gone through and look at areas where we could not necessarily save all of the money but transfer of responsibilities out of the pentagon and consolidate programs and save a significant amount of money. >> this weekend you can talk with tom coburn of the future of the republican party on and depth. live sunday at noon eastern on but tv. >> the program began, one of the of as as to president franklin roosevelt. to document the conditions under which people were living. this was when we did not have television. a lot of places did not have electricity said it could not listen to the radio broadcast to find out what was going on and other parts of the country. an economist from columbia, he is the head of this project. they sent from to have his photographers try out and see w
to our website for more details. washington insiders tackle fiscal cliff policy solutions. the group will hold a roundtable discussion today on the importance of reform to address the nation's debt and deficit spending this event takes place this morning around 8:30 a.m. eastern time. go to our website for all our coverage of the fiscal cliff talks. we have a web site set up so you can follow along on our special page for these fiscal cliff talks. back to your phone calls. good morning, doris. caller: good morning. the plan that the republicans offered, this is just the romney-ryan plan that the american voters said no to. other than destroying our earned benefit, i do not call them entitlements because we worked hard and we earned them. there are no specifics. what loopholes will they close? of course, they are going to punish the poor and middle- class. their plan still gives another huge tax cut to the 1%. people need to look at what happened to this country between fdr and nixon. look at what happened with the conservative takeover from nixon until now. host: we are going to have
debt push has doubters in the discussion about the fiscal cliff. host: and in the washington post is a picture of three c.e.o.'s coming out of the white house. this is patricia wuertz, she is the chief executive of archer daniel's midland. emmett fraser of merck and another person walking out. we're going to move onto william in maryland on our republican line. hi, william. caller: gorn. i love watching c-span, i'm a first time caller. host: welcome. caller: thank you. i'm not the greatest at this, but i can tell you as an african-american republican, who is a home owner association's president for his community of 339 homes, and someone who works in security, and someone who volunteers at least 40 hours a week on his community, there is a issue with us as americans and picking up slack. we put too much on the federal government to do. we as people need to stand more for each other and help each other. and i guarantee you if we took the money out of the politics, and we as the people stood together with one another and helped each other as in the churches and the communities, just
. ♪ host: we will spend about two hours this morning on the "washington journal" talking about the fiscal cliff. we want to start off hearing from you on a different topic. what do you think about hillary clinton's future and her running for president in 2016? that is our question this morning on the "washington journal." you can start dialing in now, or you can contact us via social media. you can make a comment on our facebook page. you can also send us an e-mail. from "the hill" newspaper yesterday -- a new poll by abc news and "the washington post." 57% say they support a presidential bid from every clinton in 2016. -- from hillary clinton in 2016. 68% approved of her work as secretary of state. 66% hold a favorable view of clinton after her department has faced criticism over the handling of benghazi and libya. clinton also has heavy support in new york were 54% of registered voters say they would support a presidential bid by her in 2016. that is an "the hill" newspaper. we have lots of facebook comments already on this question. we want to share a couple of those with thieu. jackie
. >> as these fiscal cliff negotiations and debate continues, i think it's important to remember that washington doesn't have a revenue problem, it has a spending problem. and under this administration, under president obama, we have seen record deficits and a record debt accumulate, and yet he keeps demanding that we raise taxes to pay for more spending. this will only hurt our economy. ernst and young has done an analysis of the president's proposal and said it will cost several hundreds thousands of jobs. there is a better way and the speaker has laid it out. it is an approach that calls for tax reform by reforming the tax code and passing responsible spending cuts in order to get our fiscal house in order. that's what america wants. the big things. this is our moment to provide that leadership that america desperately wants and we stand here ready to take the action necessary. >> the american people are hurting right now and now is the moment where we need to step up to the plate and solve the problem. i don't know how any of us can look our kids and grandkids in the eye and explain to them that w
a 39.6%. that's the washington post this morning. below that, governors say the fiscal cliff would hurt their states' economies. several governors met at the white house yesterday and with political leaders to say something needs to be done or their economies and on the state level will be heard. -- be hurt. let's go to walter in new jersey, independent caller. good morning. caller: good morning. i don't know what's wrong with these people, because they have to come to some kind of agreement. the gop has to give ground, taxes wouldybody's go up just to save 2%. it just does not cut it. it is a bad move politically and bad for the country. host: polloi in johnsonville, virginia. -- floyd. caller: i was thinking about the fiscal cliff. i don't think that's the problem at. the problem is when we fell off the moral cliff. our president said gay marriage was ok. and america killing so many babies. side,e get back on god's everything else will take care of itself. that's the way it is. a guy said it seemed like christians are down and out. let me tell you, christians are the happiest people t
expenditures. washington journal is live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern. our coverage of the fiscal cliff has reached speaking with the house speaker and the minority leader. president obama speech to members of the business roundtable about the negotiations and the economy. he told ceos he would not negotiate. because of technical problems, we can only show you part of his remarks. >> we are grateful for both the electricity and the engagement we have had with members of your team. i know your team has really reached out significantly over the last few months to many people in this room and i know personally, the outreach to us is genuine and we know you are seeking solutions. but that was outlined very sincerely this morning when we met with jack and the rest of the team. i hope you get the same sense of purpose and commitment from us as we engage with you. there aren't a lot of wallflowers' in here. we are eager for a two-way exchange nonetheless. hopefully your take away would be to have a useful purpose in the dialogue. mr. president, thank you for joining us today. [applause] >> good mo
: on the subject of the fiscal cliff, john boehner declares a stalemate. this is the headline in an article from politico. the major sticking points remain the same, congressional democrats want to raise taxes on the highest income earners while keeping the current lower tax rates in place for the middle class. republicans want to extend tax breaks at all levels. good morning and welcome to "washington journal." we are going to be talking about the fiscal cliff, the statements the house speaker made about being a stalemate and what the president said during his trip to a toy factory in pennsylvania. here are the numbers. you can also reach out to us by e-mail and twitter and facebook, all of the social media as. on twitter the addresses @cspanwj, facebook.com/cspan. more from the article by jake sherman with the headline " fiscal cliff." he writes -- let's go to the phones. the first call comes from debbie in flint, mich. on the line for democrats. caller: i think they need to pass a law that these guys did not get paid. if i go to work and did not do my job, they will not pay me. they have not
. and on tomorrow morning's "washington journal" peter welch and the latest developments on the fiscal cliff negotiations. josephhat, political'o's schatz. "washington journal" live tomorrow morning at 7 a.m. eastern. >> we have had explosions of knowledge in medicine. we have not coordinated. there are services that we have. they end up having so many cracks that the cracks are harmful to the diseases we are treating. you need to step back and ask, are we hurting people over all on a global level? what are we doing question mark -- what are we doing? now we have reports saying that 30% of everything we do may not be necessary in healthcare. the test we order and the procedures -- this is something that i think for the first time is really being called out as a problem. >> this function in the u.s. industry. dr. marty makary on c-span 2. >> the group campaign to fix the debt -- the former co-chair of the national debt commission. at the event, we hear from white house economic adviser gene sperling and senator rob portman of ohio. senator portman was interrupted several times by protesters.
with president obama tuesday to discuss the soda ash called fiscal cliff and its impact on states and the economy. -- the so-called fiscal clef. members of the national governors' association spoke to reporters but the white house for about 15 minutes. >> good morning, everybody. i am the chair of the national governors' association, the governor of the telephone, -- of delaware, joined by the governor of oklahoma, the vice chair. and we are also joined by the governors of wisconsin and arkansas. we are three democrats and three republicans. we just had what i would say it was a very good meeting with the president. the issues we face as governors and states are considered as part of the discussions going on in washington. the president was very open. we talked about some of the issues we focus on as governors, one of those same opportunities for flexibility, in terms of some of the programs we partner with the federal government. he was open to that as well. and there is an impact not just from the fiscal issues, but the issues in terms of how the discussions here will impact the economy's back
be involved in negotiations over the fiscal cliff. this is 50 minutes. host: we turn our attention to deductions and tax loopholes. some are potentially on the chopping block. joining us is john mckinnon from "the wall street journal." what are loopholes and deductions? guest: loopholes or tax breaks of all different sorts. whether you like a loophole depends where you sit. deductions are the ones most people are most familiar with. the big itemized deductions are the home mortgage interest deduction. the deduction for charitable contributions is important. there are all kinds of other breaks. there are some that are big that people may not be aware of. the health care that we get a work represents a big source of income to a lot of people. it doesn't count as income on your taxes. that is a giant break in itself and known as an exemption. there are other breaks that exist. the earned income tax credit goes to the working poor. then folks with children get a child credit that is a lucrative credit, worth $1,000 per child right now. congress loves tax breaks. host: is there a differ
's "washington journal." host: julie, let's start with the fiscal cliff. where does health policy, health care fit into this if at all? guest: obviously what -- there's nothing about the fiscal cliff that particularly impacts the health law. we do know that starting january 1, if congress does not act, there are these automatic cuts that take effect. compared is impacted only slightly. there will be 2% cut to payments to providers, not to beneficiaries, medicaid is excluded. however also on january 1, this is not part of this whole sequester piece, there is the problem medicare physician fees, the perennial problem, it happens to also expire in conjunction with everything else that happens on january 1. there would be a 27% cut to doctor payments under medicare, something that congress continues to not let happen, but they have to find several billion dollars, or if they want to make it go away for good, several hundred billion dollars to fix that problem. so there are a lot of health related issues involved in these negotiations. there are a lot of people, a lot of republicans, who would like
into the fiscal cliff? is there anything going on that's give them more of an argument? are they coming to washington like everyone else to have their point of view heard it? guest: yes, they are lobbying hard to protect the important reduction that they now have for charitable contributions. -- deduction that they our out for charitable contributions. i do not think that this will get resolved finally just in the next three or four weeks. the timing is something that they are working, like everybody else is. they are certainly arguing that this is a big moment and they do not want to lose their deduction now. but as i said earlier, i think a lot of these deductions will be made over a time of a year or so. this fight go on. host: maryland, democrats line. go ahead. caller: thank you for letting me speak on your show this morning. i just want to make a statement about the tax reform. it is not really going to hurt the stock market. it is just going to affect the economy the same as gas prices or food prices going up on the poor and middle class. life will go on. just like life has gone
-span. tonight, and look at the white house and congress and how they are addressing the so-called fiscal cliff. first, president obama speaks in pennsylvania, followed by john boehner responded to the president from capitol hill. then eric cantor response of the lighthouse deficit reduction package. later, nancy pelosi addresses the fiscal cliff and middle- class tax cuts. president obama talked about the so-called fiscal cliff and his proposal to end of the bush tax cuts on those earning more than two and a $50,000. ed -- more than $250,000. ["hail to the chief" plays] please have a seat. have a seat. relax for a second. it is good to see all of you. hello. it is good to be back in pennsylvania. it is good to be right here. i want to thank michael, robert, and the investor, joel glickman for hosting me today and giving me a great tour. stand up so everybody can see you, guys. [cheers and applause] there you go. we have a couple of outstanding members of congress here. [cheers and applause] now, i just finished getting a tour of the workshop. i have to say it makes me wish that joel invented t
and save a significant amount of money. >> you can talk with tom coburn about the fiscal cliff and the future of the republican party on "in depth." the senator has written several books and reports. join us for senator tom coburn, live sunday at noon eastern on c-span2. "washington journal" continues. host: we are looking at various aspects at the so-called fiscal cliff. joining us for the discussion is steven sloan. he is with politico. could you define what a tax credit is and how that differs from a tax deduction? guest: credits and deductions are used to lower somebody's tax bill. if you have it $1,000 tax bill, -- basically a reduces taxable income, so it takes the taxable income off the top. if you have a $1,000 tax deduction, that is basically a to under $50 deduction -- $250 deduction. host: on their tax credits that specifically affect families? guest: some that have expired that are part of the fiscal cliff package. they get much less attention than the bush tax cuts. they are part of the packet of decisions that congress has to make. host: we can go into debt but to
are playing in the ongoing negotiations concerning the fiscal cliff. from the government accountability office, they discussed the state of the facilities at guantanamo bay and the factors to be considered in moving detainee's stateside. and what did it did for near east policy, the latest from egypt after president mohammad morsi granted himself hoarse above the court. washington journal, live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public-service by your television provider. >> now secretary of state hillary clinton talks about her recent travels to the middle east to help broker a ceasefire agreement between israel and hamas and the gaza strip. she also, the iranian nuclear threat and criticizes israel's decision to build homes on israeli occupied lands. this is a little over an hour. [applause] >> i am somewhat overwhelmed, but i'm obviously thinking i should sit down. [laughter] i prepared some remarks for tonight, but then i thought maybe we could just watch that video a few more times. [laughter] and then the next tim
is a day closer going over the fiscal cliff and the harder it will be to find a solution. americans want washington to work together, to get our country back on track, and to ensure we leave it a better place than we found it for future generations and then let's make the hard decisions. let's make those decisions we know west -- must be made. thank you for listening and th. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> lives of great men all remind us we can make our lives sublime and our party leave behind us footsteps on the sands of time. warren rudman left footsteps in the united states senate and on the sands of time. many people serve here and are soon forgotten, and he is not one of them. i think the reasons are quite simple. he was admired. he had courage and principals. he got things done. he made things happen. he cared more about his country than a bit about anything else. as a result, his country cares about him and then we care about him and that is why we're here. that is why we are honoring him today. i
the fiscal cliff and the harder it will be to find a solution. americans want washington to work together, to get our country back on track, and to ensure we leave it a better place than we found it for future generations. let's make the hard decisions. let's make those decisions we know must be made. thank you for listening. >> coming up, "the communicators" looks at privacy and communication. the condoleezza rice talks about education reform and cyber security. then the memorial service for then the memorial service for warren
our economy. how to deal with them in a responsible way, get us passed this fiscal cliff, passed in august, only plan in washington, d.c., to prevent these debilitating tax increases from hitting across all of our family owned small businesses. finally, mr. speaker, h.r. 6365, it's the national security and job protection act. we passed that in september. that's the bill that looks specifically at these coming defense cuts. these cuts that secretary of defense leon panetta has called devastating in their impact. i know you do, mr. speaker, leon panetta, former chief of staff to president bill clinton, former chairman of the democratic-led budget committee here in the u.s. house of representatives, current secretary of defense calls these defense cuts devastating. this u.s. house has passed a proposal to prevent that second round of cuts from taking place. it's the only proposal anywhere in this town to have passed. we did in august. we took care of our business and we have yet to have partnership from either the white house or the senate. on that proposal. we took the sequester r
. on washington journal" we have been looking elements of the so- called fiscal cliff -- a discussion of the expiring tax provisions set to hit january 1. host: we have been focusing on different parts of the fiscal cliff discussion. today we're looking at tax extenders for businesses and individuals. joining us is sam goldfarb, a tax writer for cq roll call. what our tax extenders? guest: they are temporary tax breaks. some people are concerned the entire tax code is turning into a big tax extender. they are considered to be a small provision and targeted at specific types of businesses. host: why are they temporary? guest: a lot of people say they should be made permanent or they should be eliminated altogether. it is easier to pass when they are temporary. they keep on being extended and extended. host: we will look at some of these. these are some of the tax extenders and the cost of continuing the tax breaks through 2013. host: some of those are really specific. guest: that is the idea. they have become a case study in what some people think is wrong with the tax code. if there a
.m. eastern on c-span. >> the authors of the simpson- bowles debt reduction plan talk about the fiscal cliff and choices facing congress. both alan simpson and erskine bowles have emphasized the need for revenue increases and entitlement reform. they have urged congress to reach a compromise. this is hosted by the "christian science monitor." >> here we go. our guest this morning are erskine bowles and senator alan simpson, a co-chairman of the national commission on fiscal responsibility and reform and co-founders of the campaign to fix the debt or as the new york times called them this morning, the debt duo. their last joint appearance with us was in november of 2010. let me thank them both for a much for coming back. we're all trying to fix the nation's fiscal woes. erskine bowles is president the university of north carolina. he also had a career in investment banking and venture capital. the team in washington in 1993 service director of the small business administration and was later mentioned -- named chief of staff to president alan simpson clintonala followed his father's footsteps
heard about tax reductions and credits that would go away if the fiscal cliff passes in january. >> board or series looking into the so-called fiscal cliff, we turn our attention to deductions and tax loopholes. some of them are potentially on the chopping block. joining us from the wall street journal is don mckinnon. thanks so much for joining us today. what are the loopholes and deductions? we hear those words a lot, but what are they? guest: loopholes or tax breaks of all different sorts, and whether you like a particular loophole or not depends on where you sit, i guess. there are lots of loopholes that are deductions. deductions are those that most people are familiar with. the big, itemized deductions are things like the home mortgage interest deduction. there is a deduction for state and local taxes that is very important, the deduction for charitable contributions is real important, and there are all kinds of other breaks that people are less familiar with. there are some that people are probably not aware of but all that are very big and important. for instance, the he
spending in washington and finally address the problem. >> as we continue to try to solve the fiscal cliff, the thing week of always continued to look at is our economy. wanting it to continue to grow. today in the whip's office we'll have small family-owned businesses in there talking about ways that we can protect the family business, continue to grow, while at the same time make sure we solve this fiscal cliff. look, each and every day, as we walk the halls, you continue to ask questions. you want the answers solving the fiscal cliff. we put an answer on the table. the president now has to engage. i think the next 72 hours are critical. if he sits back and continues to play politics, that will give you an answer of where we're going. this is an opportunity for this country to lead. this is an opportunity for the president to lead. >> at these fiscal cliff negotiations and debate continues, i think it's important to remember that washington doesn't have a revenue problem. it has a spending problem. and under this administration, under president obama, we have seen record deficits and a r
leadership on the democratic side. we are talking about the so-called fiscal cliff. of course our cameras have been covering all of the events here in washington as both sides try to negotiate their argument with the public. if you go to our website, c-span.org, we have a special website setaside, webpage, c-span.org/fiscalcliff. or tweet us your thoughts using the #fiscal cliff. go ahead, payton. caller: thank you. i'm one of the original owners and i live in one of the poorest areas of the country which is one of the most highly republican areas of the country. i always intended if the republicans -- host: we are losing you, there. caller: somebody else is speaking. what i want to tell you is this cost of living is shameful way to protect the rich. host: we'll leave it there, payton. guest: he's got -- i can't add much to that. you're right. the previous caller who had talked making $14,000, he and his wife, their total income was $14,000 year on sfments he's not throwing -- on social security. he's not throwing money around. you start limiting the cost of living, the increases to keep
house deficit reduction package. later, nancy pelosi addresses the fiscal cliff and middle- class tax cuts. tomorrow on ", washington "" robert -- "washington journal," robert van order on the mortgage loan forgiveness. adult'eman on being an with autism. plus, your emails, phone calls, and tweets. >> c-span, created by cable companies and venture 1979, brought to you as a public service by >> president obama talked about the so-called fiscal cliff and his proposal to end the bush era tax cuts. he spoke at a manufacturing facility in hatfield, pennsylvania, for about 25 minutes. >> thank you! [cheers and applause] >> well, good morning, everybody. everybody, please have a seat, have a seat. relax for a second. it is good to see all of you. hello, hatfield! it is good to be back in pennsylvania and it is good to be right here at connects. i want to thank michael airington and the inventor of connects, joel glickman, for hosting me today. where'd they go? stand up so everybody can see you guys. there you go! i just noticed, we got a couple of outstanding members of congress here. chaka
in the fiscal cliff negotiations. and then a "politico" tax senator is also on the program. he looks at the estate tax which is set to go up at the end of the year unless congress and the white house act. you can see that starting at 7:00 a.m. eastern time tomorrow morning here on c-span. this morning we also had a look at the fiscal cliff. host: we're looking at different pass expects of the fiscal cliff. today we turn our attention to the alternative minimum tax and the patch that could come from congress if they're able to work out a deal. if they do nothing this will impact 30 million americans. joining to us discuss is georgetown law's john buckley. thank you for being here. john buckley, let's begin. what is the alternative minimum tax? guest: in very simple terms, the alternative minimum tax requires you to pay the greater of what you pay under the regular income tax or what you would compute under the minimum tax which has a slightly broader base. it disallows some deductions that would be allowed in the regular tax. in some respects it's very similar to cap on itemized deduc
:00 eastern. we will take your questions and comments as we focus on the fiscal cliff. the house of representatives is back in session at 10:00 eastern for general speeches. legislative business begins at noon. several live events to tell you about today on our companion network c-span 3. craig fugate will testify about the response to hurricane sandy. that is at 10:00 a.m. eastern. the coalition for pasqual national security will focus on how the national security is impacted by the deficit. mike mullen will testify along with others. later, the center for strategic international studies host a forum on u.s. relations with china in light of china's leadership transition. that is at 5:30 eastern p.m.. ♪ >> this weekend on c-span 3, follow harry truman's grandson to hiroshima as the city celebrates -- remembers the dropping of the bomb. >> everybody has their own view. i do not want to argue about the history. i think we are past that. my goal and purpose for being here is to honor the dead and listen to the living. i want to do what i can add to make sure this does not happen a
from falling off the fiscal cliff. it's time for democrats to come to the table with something more than job-killing taxes. if they have serious ideas for entitlement reform, the american people deserve to hear them. unfortunately, mr. speaker, the reason we haven't heard democrat ideas for entitlement reform may be because they have no plans to cut or reform entitlement spending at all. this is just another game from their playbook. raise taxes and increase spending, as always. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the house will come to order. the house will come to order. will members please take their conversations off the floor. are there any more "for one minutes? -- for one minutes? any more requests for one minutes? the gentleman from texas. without objection. mr. poe: on christmas day most of us will wake up with our families, smell of turkey in the often, homemade apple pie. but on the other side of the world there are men and women who will wake up in the middle of the desert who are representing and protecting america's liberty. those a
mcconnell to talk about the so- called fiscal cliff. for more, go to our website, c- span.org. grover norquist of americans for tax reform talks about his no tax increase pledge. that is at c-span.org. tomorrow on "washington journal ," julie rovner discusses the health care law. kem dixon looks at the payroll tax cut that was enacted in 2010 and if the white house plans to extend it. then a discussion of whether will be extended and the impact on our current economy. plusher e-mails, phone calls, and tweets. >> on 16 or 17 basis in the united states we have military run schools. the average cost per child per year in those schools is $50,000. almost four times what the rest of the public education costs. the vast majority of our bases used public schools. we could take the money we are spending today, paying every public school system 14 dozen dollars per child, and save billions of dollars per year, and with the same or better outcomes. >> this weekend, you can talk with senator tom coburn about the fiscal cliff and the future of the republican party. the senator has written several
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)